Investigating Countries Fail To Request MH17 Crash Info From German Detective

Neither the Netherlands nor Malaysia have timely asked German detective Josef Resch to provide information about the 2014 Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash over eastern Ukraine, and the detective is therefore withdrawing his offer to disclose the evidence related to the case, Resch's lawyer said.

The detective, who has been carrying out his own probe into the MH17 crash since 2014, has said that he knows the Names of persons responsible for the crash and has some other information that the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team (JIT) allegedly ignores. Resch has also said later that he will disclose the information only if the JIT, Dutch prosecutors and "possibly created by that time a Malaysian investigative committee" confirm officially by October 18 that the disclosure will be made in presence of global media and interested parties.

"I tell you on behalf of my client that no one has used the opportunity, provided by my client, to reveal the evidence. No statement has been received in the period of time that he has outlined, neither from the JIT, nor from the Dutch prosecution, nor from the Malaysian investigative committee, nor from any other agency.

"This deadline has expired," the lawyer said in a letter, stressing that Resch believes that investigators are not interested in learning the truth and is therefore withdrawing his proposal.

The lawyer went on to say that on October 18 his client received an e-mail from a Dutch journalist, working for De Telegraaf newspaper, in which the journalist said that the prosecution did not accept the conditions outlined by Resch.

"I am authorized to say, on behalf of my client, that such communication is not acceptable," the lawyer added.

MH17 process can take up to four years

Private investigator Joseph Resch has set a deadline for the Joint Investigation Team to accept the information under the condition of transparency, otherwise it would show that JIT is not interested in real investigation.

The Dutch Public Prosecutor's Office, which heads the Joint Investigation Team, informed relatives of the victims of MH17 about the upcoming criminal proceedings. It is known that the process, which is scheduled to start on March 9, will take about two years. If the judge will demand further investigations, the process can last up to four years.

The relatives are pleased that the process is finally taking place. In the near future there will also be one-on-one talks with the public prosecutor's office. There will also be a discussion who wants to have the right to speak and access to the procedural documents.

Four men have been officially charged by the Dutch Court . But it is still unknown who gave the order and who is directly responsible for the shooting. The prosecution relies on evidence from the network and on telephone calls presented by the Ukrainian intelligence service SBU, which are said to have been manipulated, as Malaysian forensic scientists have found out. The JIT has not commented on this. Even the chat of a Russian soldier with "Anastasia" seems questionable. The JIT actually uses expressions like "obvious" or "can be accepted" when trying to show the evidence. It is clear that Russia will not deport the accused citizens and can not do so for legal reasons.

The Dutch "Telegraaf" also points out that the JIT does not want to see or notice evidence that the private investigator Josef Resch has been offering since 2016, most recently on 5.7.2019 in a published letter.

Resch does not seem to be interested in giving the investigation a certain direction, but he rightly complains that, for reasons of objectivity, the information he has received should at least be viewed.

German Detective To Disclose MH17 Crash Evidence Only In Presence Of Interested Parties

"Mr. Resch says that he will disclose the information only if the JIT, Dutch prosecutors and possibly created by that time a Malaysian investigative committee will confirm in a written statement no later than October 18 that the disclosure will be made in the presence of the international media and the interested states," a letter of Resch's lawyer read.

According to the letter, if there is no decision concerning the Resch's request, the detective will consider the case as closed and refuse to give testimony in the European Court of Human Rights.

German Detective Ready to Discuss Sharing Info on MH17 Crash With Malaysia

Joseph Resch, a German detective, who carried out his own investigation into the 2014 Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash over east Ukraine, ordered by a private client, said that he was ready to discuss sharing his findings on the causes of the tragedy with the Malaysian authorities.

"We believe that the Malaysian authorities should contact us via the embassy or a lawyer, so that they could inform the Malaysian government about the ways this could be organised, if the conditions are satisfied," Resch said.

In July, Resch, who has been independently investigating the MH17 disaster since 2014 at the behest of an unnamed client, attempted to submit potentially groundbreaking new material on the case to the Dutch-led Joint Investigative Team (JIT), but was rejected after he asked to make the information public.

In mid-2015, an unnamed informant turned to the detective, allegedly providing him with important insider information.

Malaysia Airlines Flight MH17, was shot down on 17 July 2014 as it was flying over eastern Ukraine, where a military conflict between the Ukrainian Army and the Donetsk People's Republic (DPR) was taking place at the time. Kiev delegated the investigation into the incident to the Netherlands, but before the probe even started, Western governments accused Russia of supplying the DPR with the weaponry that had allegedly had downed the plane. Moscow denied being involved in the conflict in general, let alone supplying the DPR with arms.