Investigating Countries Fail To Request MH17 Crash Info From German Detective

Neither the Netherlands nor Malaysia have timely asked German detective Josef Resch to provide information about the 2014 Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash over eastern Ukraine, and the detective is therefore withdrawing his offer to disclose the evidence related to the case, Resch's lawyer said.

The detective, who has been carrying out his own probe into the MH17 crash since 2014, has said that he knows the Names of persons responsible for the crash and has some other information that the Dutch-led Joint Investigation Team (JIT) allegedly ignores. Resch has also said later that he will disclose the information only if the JIT, Dutch prosecutors and "possibly created by that time a Malaysian investigative committee" confirm officially by October 18 that the disclosure will be made in presence of global media and interested parties.

"I tell you on behalf of my client that no one has used the opportunity, provided by my client, to reveal the evidence. No statement has been received in the period of time that he has outlined, neither from the JIT, nor from the Dutch prosecution, nor from the Malaysian investigative committee, nor from any other agency.

"This deadline has expired," the lawyer said in a letter, stressing that Resch believes that investigators are not interested in learning the truth and is therefore withdrawing his proposal.

The lawyer went on to say that on October 18 his client received an e-mail from a Dutch journalist, working for De Telegraaf newspaper, in which the journalist said that the prosecution did not accept the conditions outlined by Resch.

"I am authorized to say, on behalf of my client, that such communication is not acceptable," the lawyer added.