Two injured after Iran passenger plane lands on runway

An aging Iranian passenger airliner carrying 144 people crash-landed on a runway and skidded onto a major highway next to an airport Monday, the latest crash in the Islamic Republic as U.S. sanctions bar it from parts or new aircraft.

Authorities said two people suffered injuries in the hard landing of the McDonnell Douglas MD-83 flown by Caspian Airlines in Mahshahr, a city in Iran’s oil-rich southwestern Khuzestan province.

Passengers, apparently in shock, calmly exited the aircraft with their carry-on baggage out of a door near the cockpit and another over the plane’s wing, video from Iran’s Civil Aviation Network News showed. A flight attendant shouted at passengers to calmly walk away as another crew member joined her on the wing.

Provincial airport director Mohammad Reza Rezanian said all of the passengers had been safely taken off the plane, which had been flying a route from the Iranian capital, Tehran, some 610 kilometers (380 miles) northeast of Mahshahr. The plane carried 136 passengers and eight crew members, authorities said.

It seems that tragedy was narrowly avoided, however, as images from the scene showed the plane had ground to a halt not far from a populated area. The plane also missed traffic on a major highway linking Mahshahr to Imam Khomeini Port.

Iranian state television said the plane involved in Monday’s crash-landing came in harder than usual and lost its landing gear as it hit the tarmac.

Tree American firefighters killed in Australia plane crash identified

The three Americans who died fighting an Australian bushfire from the air have been identified by their employer, Oregon-based Coulson Aviation.

The three are 44-year-old Capt. Ian McBeth of Great Falls, Montana, who was piloting the downed C-130 plane; First Officer Paul Clyde Hudson, age 42, of Buckeye, Arizona; and 43-year-old Flight Engineer Rick DeMorgan Jr., who lived in Navarre, Florida, Coulson.

"The aviation industry and emergency service sector is a small community both in Australia and around the world," Coulson said. "This will be deeply felt by all."All three men were veterans of the US military, Coulson said. The cause of the crash is not yet known.

A government official in Australia said the water tanker plane had been chartered by the New South Wales Rural Fire Service. The crew had been on a firebombing mission in the state of New South Wales, where fires are still burning out of control, when the accident occurred, Coulson said earlier. According to the New South Wales Rural Fire Service commissioner, Shane Fitzsimmons, contact was lost with the C-130 water-bombing plane shortly before 1:30 p.m. local time on Thursday.

Fires have been burning in New South Wales for months, and the US and other countries have been lending firefighting assistance and personnel. The US said Wednesday it's sending two more 20-person crews, only days after sending air support personnel and other emergency management teams. The US has deployed more than 200 fire staff to Australia so far, according to the National Interagency Fire Center.

Opinion: Why Governments Must Decide When Not To Fly

by Mark Zee

Until Ukraine International Airlines Flight PS752 was shot down just before dawn in Tehran on Jan. 8, the tempting narrative was that the destruction of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 in 2014 was a black swan event.

Iran’s acknowledgment that it shot down PS752 removes that doubt and painfully validates our 5.5 years of work on airspace risk awareness, but it also makes clear that this work was not enough to prevent a repeat tragedy. It is now evident that governments must play a more active role in preventing airlines from flying in conflict zones.

The work the aviation industry has done post-MH17 has not been for nothing. Far from it. Cooperation and collaboration around risk among airlines and among government departments, which was largely frowned upon before MH17, has become acceptable.

Risk awareness is higher than ever before. Information-sharing has moved from small, closed circles to large, open groups.

But underlying that work was an uncertainty around the need for it all. The reason: Risk is nebulous.

A decision to avoid risk averts a situation that might occur. Despite the usual scales of low, medium, and high, the true likelihood is always low. There is no data to provide answers afterward: What did not happen cannot be measured. Airline security managers are therefore under tremendous pressure. Money spent on risk avoidance has no clear billing code. But the temptation to err on the side of saving costs is ever present.

Herein lies the impasse. The ultimate final decision in approach to risk lies with the airline or aircraft operator, which is in most cases a business. Passengers and pilots have an undeniable first priority to stay alive.

A business has the same priority, of course. Every decision in a business will ultimately be a commercial decision to ensure it stays alive. This explains why airlines continued to fly to Tehran even when it was abundantly clear this was a shootdown event.

A lesson from the last five years of our work is that like businesses under pressure to fly through conflict zones, countries cannot be relied upon to close risky airspace or issue damaging guidance about their own territories. Iran is not alone in this. A string of other nations have made similar decisions: Cyprus, Egypt, Ethiopia, Iraq, Japan, Kenya, Libya, Mali, North Korea, Somalia, Syria and Turkey.  Only on one occasion—Pakistan, in 2019—has a national authority closed its airspace for reasons of conflict-zone risk. Governments have more pressing motivations in trade, tourism and commerce. This will not change.

And yet government involvement is what is needed to solve things. The civil aviation industry has done what is within its power—there are no new initiatives that can take us further.

The position that aircraft operators are solely responsible for making risk decisions favors the handful of large airlines that have the resources to continually assess risk. The overwhelming majority cannot. For thousands of operators, relying on internal or external support to make qualified, informed essential risk decisions is simply not practical. The operational staffing of even a medium-size airline is small, especially at night, when most rapid-onset risk situations occur.

Right now, only a handful of countries are active in prohibiting their carriers from risky areas. But it works.

On the night in question, the U.S. had issued a notice to airmen that prevented its pilots and carriers from operating in Iran, several hours before the shootdown. If there were going to be an incident, it would not involve a U.S. aircraft.

When the U.S. prevents its carriers from flying through a conflict zone, many airlines follow—especially when backed up by Germany, France or the UK. But no system, organization or clear channel exists for that information to be passed to all concerned. This must change.

Each state has a duty to care for its citizens. Most governments have the resources to assess risk. This duty of care needs to be extended to pilots and passengers aboard aircraft.

In the first weeks of 2020, international travel advice about Iraq and Iran from the foreign affairs departments of many countries was clear: Do not travel. That same advice needs to extend to aircraft operators: Do not fly. 

Mark Zee is the founder of Opsgroup, an organization of 7,000 members working in international flight operations that share information to improve awareness of risk, operational procedures and changes after MH17 exposed the lack of collaboration in the industry. He also manages Safe Airspace: The Conflict Zone & Risk Database.

Lessons have not been learned...

Europe’s pilots are shocked and deeply saddened by the downing of Ukrainian Airlines flight PS752 in Iran and the killing of all 176 people on board.

This comes only a few years after the downing of Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 (MH17), in 2014. It is tragic proof that some lessons from MH17 on flying into or over conflict zones have not been learnt. Europe has no effective system in place to reduce those risks. The airspace over Ukraine and Iran should have been closed.

Having seen major airlines continue flying to Tehran in the days after the shooting down – despite the security threat – European pilots call for urgent and pragmatic solutions.

“It is clear that we cannot rely on conflict-stressed states to restrict or close their own airspace. We must in principle rely on our national authorities and our airlines to make sure that the lives of passengers and crew are adequately protected and this unchecked risk is addressed,” says ECA Secretary General Philip von Schöppenthau.

”However, purely national, uncoordinated action has not done the job in the past and won’t do it in the future,” he continues. “Individual Member States clearly do not share their security intelligence about conflict zones sufficiently to provide protection. As long as this is the case, and nothing substantive occurs through a dedicated European structure, we will see further flights taking unnecessary risks.”

“What we urgently need is a method of sharing and acting, not upon closely guarded intelligence, but upon the outcome of risk analysis about conflict zones. With these outcomes from different European airlines and states swiftly shared amongst each other and authorities, no European airline or pilot should be left in the dark – all have the opportunity to benefit from the effect of the privileged information of the best informed”, says ECA President Jon Horne. “Whilst many believe there should be an EU or international authority to take responsibility for the closure of hostile airspace, it is not something that shows any sign of happening soon, and so we need a pragmatic, industry-based setup that can provide meaningful protection in the here and now.”

Such a setup might not be perfect, but a stopgap solution is necessary and it was necessary five years ago when the MH17 was shot down over Ukraine as local authorities did not want to close the airspace. It could be an industry held database of current risk assessment outcomes and default procedures for any new armed conflict. It could even be a simple rule of “TWO OUT – ALL OUT”: If at least two Member States and/or two major airlines decide to not fly into a specific block of conflict-affected airspace, this decision would be taken up by all other (EU) states and airlines until the situation is clarified. This means that passengers and crew on all airlines would benefit from the secret and non-sharable intelligence available to some ‘privileged’ authorities and airlines, and by looking only at public outcomes of their risk assessments.

“These ideas are neither conventional, ideal, nor the only solutions,” says ECA Secretary General Philip von Schöppenthau. “But the international failure to effectively cope with flying over and into conflict zones keeps costing lives.”

Evening Bird: A poem dedicated to the lives lost on flight PS752

Dearly to the sun, your serpentine fins embraced bluffs, tripped the morosely linking earth & the heavens with howling wings.

You became lines of sun-split stanzas & warped seas underneath you. You hoot ecstatic stunts, ‘everyone deserved a sunbath.’                                                                                                

You didn’t have enough sleep, you ne’er dreamt. You imitated a night-disciple;

zombied your hands over your shoulders, and blurred God in the face.

Unbelievers chose the head, the tail, I chose none but you burned blue through your gasps in awe & palpitate as volatile balloons; from the lip of a knitting needle. You gasped fireworks, heaven echoed fossil fuels.

Against the hard clicks of a gong & strikes of human-skinned drums, the spotlight was moved to us in thick tears, & our tight gullets as a tourniquet.

We were displaced, cruised amid police gossamers           ‘police lines, do not cross.

Our feet swept metallic feathers, our hands with a kettle douche in a pool of grief; one flopped a portrait & the other lantern. The debris clasped our locust jeans to melting plastics & iron shafts.  

Evening bird, as you watched tears rain from our eyes & haven’t yet proved enough theory on risk society, please; Fall! Fall!! Fall alone!!! like a thunderbolt faraway from our smiles.

Bayowa Ayomide

The victims of Ukraine Flight PS752

A Ukrainian Boeing 737-800 crashed shortly after take-off in Iran on Wednesday, killing all 176 people on board.

In total, 82 Iranians and 63 Canadians were on board the Kyiv-bound Ukraine International Airlines (UIA) Flight PS752, Ukraine's Foreign Minister Vadym Prystaiko said.

There were also 11 victims - including nine crew members - from Ukraine, four Afghans, four Britons and three Germans.

Iran's head of emergency operations said 147 of the victims were Iranian, which suggests many of the foreign nationals held dual nationality.

A list of passengers was released by the airline, but the BBC is awaiting confirmation from people known to the victims.

Canada 'shocked and saddened'

The majority of the passengers on the flight were headed for Canada, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau confirmed. Out of the 176 victims, 138 had listed Canada as their final destination.

Of them, 57 of them carried a Canadian passport, but many others were foreign students, permanent residents or visitors.

Initially, the number of Canadian victims was given as 63.

A number of the passengers on board the plane were reportedly students and university staff from Canada returning at the end of the holidays.

The tragedy was a national one, touching many communities across the country.

British Columbia

Ardalan Ebnoddin Hamidi, Niloofar Razzaghi and their teenage son Kamyar, a family of three from Vancouver were returning from Iran where they had taken a short vacation and were confirmed to have been on the flight.

The University of British Columbia said it is mourning the loss of Mehran Abtahi, a postdoctoral research fellow, and sibling alumnus Zeynab Asadi Lari and Mohammad Asadi Lari.

"She was full of dreams, and now they're gone," Elnaz Morshedi told the BBC of her friend Zeynab Asadi Lari, who was studying health sciences.

Her brother Mohammmad was the co-founder of STEM fellowship, a youth-run charity that helps students in maths and sciences.

Other victims from the west coast province include Delaram Dadashnejad, an international student studying nutrition at a college in Vancouver, and couple Naser Pourshaban Oshibi and Firouzeh Madani.

Alberta

The University of Alberta confirmed that 10 members of the institution's community were killed in the tragedy.

Pedram Mousavi and Mojgan Daneshmand, a married couple who taught engineering at the University of Alberta, were killed in the crash, along with their two daughters, Daria, 14, and Dorina, 9.

Arash Pourzarabi, 26,and Pouneh Gourji, 25, were graduate students in computer science at the university, and had gone to Iran for their wedding.

Other students who died included Elnaz Nabiyi, Nasim Rahmanifar, and Amir Saeedinia, as well as alumnus Mohammad Mahdi Elyasi, who studied mechanical engineering and graduated in 2017.

Obstetrician Shekoufeh Choupannejad, her daughter Saba Saadat, who was studying medicine at the university, and Sara, who had recently graduated, were also among those on the flight

The "community is reeling from this loss," said university president David Turpin on Thursday.

Also from the province of Alberta was Kasra Saati, an aircraft mechanic formerly with Viking Air, the CBC confirmed.

Manitoba

Victims from Winnipeg included Forough Khadem, described "as a promising scientist and a dear friend," by her colleague E Eftekharpour.

Graduate student Amirhossein Ghassemi was studying biomedical engineering.

"I can't use past tense. I think he's coming back. We play again. We talk again. It's too difficult to use past tense, too difficult. No one can believe it," his friend Amir Shirzadi told CTV News.

Amirhossein Bahabadi Ghorbani, 21, was studying science at the University of Manitoba and hoped to become a doctor, his roommate told the CBC.

CBC also confirmed that a family of three from that city - Mohammad Mahdi Sadeghi, his wife, Bahareh Hajesfandiari, and their daughter, Anisa Sadeghi, were travelling together on the flight.

Farzaneh Naderi, a customer service manager at Walmart, and her 11-year-old son Noojan Sadr were also killed.

Ontario

Many of the victims were returning to their homes in Toronto and other nearby cities in the province of Ontario.

They included Ghanimat Azhdari - a PhD student at the University of Guelph, Ontario. She specialised in promoting the rights of indigenous groups and her research group described her as "cherished and loved".

Toronto resident Alina Tarbhai was also among the victims, her employer, the Ontario Secondary School Teacher's Federation (OSSTF), told the BBC. Her mother Afifa Tarbhai was also on board.

The University of Windsor, Ontario, confirmed five people from their school had died on the plane. PhD student Hamid Kokab Setareh and his wife Samira Bashiri, who was also a researcher at the school, were among those killed.

Omid Arsalani told CBC that his sister Evin Arsalani, 30, had travelled to Iran to attend a wedding with her husband, Hiva Molani, 38, and their one-year-old daughter Kurdia. All three were killed in the crash.

The University of Toronto confirmed the loss of students Mojtaba Abbasnezhad, Mohammad Amin Beiruti, and Mohammad Amin Jebelli, and Mohammad Salehe.

Seyed Hossein Mortazavi, a childhood friend of Mohammad Salehe, said he was a bit reserved and shy but a brilliant computer programmer whose talent was widely recognised.

McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario confirmed the loss of PhD students Iman Aghabali and Mehdi Eshaghian, as well as of former postdoctoral researcher Siavash Maghsoudlou Estarabadi.

The CBC confirmed that Mahdieh Ghassemi and her two children Arsan Niazi and Arnica Niazi, were on the flight.

Tirgan, an Iranian cultural charity, said "it is with a heavy heart that we bid farewell" to some volunteers with their organisation, including couple Parinaz and Iman Ghaderpanah.

The organisation said it was joining in mourning with another volunteer, Hamed Esmaeilion, who lost his wife Parisa Eghbalian, and their daughter Reera Esmaeilion.

Western University said it was mourning four international students: Ghazal Nourian, Milad Nahavandi, Hadis Hayatdavoudi, Sajedeh Saraeian.

The University of Waterloo shared the news "with heavy hearts" that their community had lost two PhD students Marzieh (Mari) Foroutan and Mansour Esnaashary Esfahani.

Quebec

Engineer Siavash Ghafouri-Azar was returning home with his new wife, Sara Mamani, when the plane crashed. The couple had just bought their first home near the Canadian city of Montreal.

His uncle, Reza Ghafouri-Azar, told the BBC "I cannot come up with words for my kind, dedicated nephew."

"He has been a very positive and passionate from childhood until his soul's departure from his body. Rest in peace my dearest side by your beloved wife," he said.

Mr Ghafouri-Azar is a professor of engineering in Toronto, and he introduced his nephew to Ali Dolatabadi, an engineering professor at Concordia University who would become Siavash's thesis supervisor.

"It is a great loss," Mr Dolatabadi told the BBC. "He was very intelligent, a gentleman. He had a kind and a gentle soul." He said his wife Sarah Mamani was "very kind, very polite". The couple were looking forward to throwing a housewarming party in the New Year.

Armin Morattab was worried when his twin Arvin Morattab, called him from the airport in Tehran, amid reports that Iran had fired missiles at US targets in Iraq.

"He said he was coming back home soon," Mr Morattab told the Montreal Gazette.

Arvin Morattab and his wife Aida Farzaneh were both killed.

The Gazette also confirmed that Mohammad Moeini, from Quebec, was also killed.

Nova Scotia

Global News confirmed that five of the victims have ties to Nova Scotia, a province on Canada's east coast.

Dalhousie University student Masoumeh Ghavi, her sister, Mandieh Ghavi, were both killed, as was local dentist Dr. Sharieh Faghihi, and two graduate students at St Mary's University, Maryam Malek and Fatemeh Mahmoodi.

Ali Nafarieh, a professor at Dalhousie and president of the Iranian Cultural Association of Nova Scotia, employed Masoumeh Ghavi part-time at his IT company. He says she was one of the university's "top students".

"I remember she has always a smile on her face. What she brought in our company in addition to skills and knowledge and experience was her energy. She changed the atmosphere over there. We'll miss her a lot," he told CTV News.

Iran victims

We have no information on the 82 Iranian nationals who died.

Tributes to British victims

Four British nationals were among the victims.

Three have been named as Mohammed Reza Kadkhoda Zadeh, who owned a dry cleaners in West Sussex, BP engineer Sam Zokaei from Twickenham, and and PhD student and engineer Saeed Tahmasebi, who lived in Dartford.

Last year, Mr Tahmasebi married his Iranian partner, Niloufar Ebrahim, who was also listed as a passenger on the plane.

Swedish children feared dead

Ten Swedish nationals died in the crash. Many of them are believed to have also had Iranian citizenship.

Swedish media report that several children were among the victims.

Sweden's foreign ministry confirmed that Swedes were among those killed. It provided no further details.

Ukrainian airline crew

Nine of the 11 Ukrainian nationals killed were staff at Ukraine International Airlines (UIA).

Valeriia Ovcharuk, 28, and Mariia Mykytiuk, 24, were among the flight attendants who died.

On their social media accounts, which are now being filled with tributes, they frequently shared photographs from their travels.

Valeria posted just two weeks ago from a hotel in Bangkok with the caption: "Work, I love you."

Ihor Matkov, was flight PS752's chief attendant. The other three flight attendants were named by the airline as Kateryna Statnik, Yuliia Solohub and Denys Lykhno.

Three pilots were on board at the time of the accident: Captain Volodymyr Gaponenko, First Officer Serhii Khomenko and instructor Oleksiy Naumkin.

All three had between 7,600 and 12,000 hours experience flying a 737 aircraft, according to the airline.

A former UIA pilot said he had flown together with each of the three pilots. Writing on Facebook, Yuri, who wanted to be known only by his first name, described them as "great pilots".

Iran plane crash: burning Boeing was trying to turn back, say Tehran investigators

The crew of the Ukrainian plane that crashed, killing all 176 people on board, never made a radio call for help and were trying to turn back to the airport when the plane went down, Iranian investigators have said.

The three-year-old jet, which had its last scheduled maintenance on Monday, encountered a technical problem shortly after take-off, said a report issued on Thursday.

Iran’s civil aviation authority made the comments in a preliminary report a day after the Ukraine International Airlines Boeing 737-800 crashed.

The investigators said the plane was engulfed in flames before it crashed. They said the crash caused a massive explosion when the plane hit the ground, likely because it had been fully loaded with fuel for the flight to Kyiv, Ukraine.

The report also confirmed that both of the so-called black boxes that contain data and cockpit communications from the plane had been recovered, though they had been damaged and some parts of their memory was lost. Iran’s aviation authority has previously said it will not hand over flight recorders either to the aircraft’s manufacturer or US aviation authorities.

The Ukrainian president, Volodymyr Zelenskiy, said crash investigators from his country had arrived in Iran to assist in the probe. He said he planned to call Iran’s president, Hassan Rouhani, about the crash and the investigation.

The priority for Ukraine was to identify the cause of the plane crash, Zelenskiy said, a sentiment echoed by the Canadian prime minister, Justin Trudeau.

Trudeau said: “Our government will continue to work closely with its international partners to ensure that … [the crash] is thoroughly investigated, and that Canadians’ questions are answered.”

Ukraine’s foreign minister, Vadym Prystaiko, said on Wednesday that there were 82 Iranians, 63 Canadians and 11 Ukrainians on board.

Boeing faces more trouble after crash of a Ukrainian 737 jet in Iran

Another tragic airline crash Wednesday could cause more problems for Boeing.

A three-year old Boeing 737-800 jet operated by Ukraine International Airlines crashed soon after takeoff from Tehran's international airport early Wednesday, killing all 176 people on board.

Iranian aviation authorities have begun an investigation. An early report from Iran's semi-official news agency ISNA blamed some kind of engine failure. But Ukrainian officials say it's too early to determine the cause, and Ukraine's embassy in Iran retracted a statement that also attributed the crash to an engine malfunction.

The 737-800 is not the 737 Max, which has gotten so much attention since two fatal crashes caused the grounding of the jet worldwide in March of 2018. All those planes remain grounded.

But the 800 version of the jet, also known as a 737 Next Generation or NG, has had its own problems. Boeing has delivered about 6,700 of these jets to airlines around the world.

In April 2018, parts of the engine on a Southwest Airlines (LUV) flight hit the side of the plane and shattered a window after a fan blade broke. The cabin depressurized and the woman sitting next to the window was killed.

In November 2019, the US National Transportation Safety Board recommended that Boeing redesign the outer covering of the planes' engines to prevent it from flying into the plane should a fan blade break on a future flight. It said that all Boeing 737 Next Generation series airplanes should be retrofitted with whatever fix Boeing comes up with.

Boeing said in November it is working on a fix for the jet covers.

But the 737 NG has other problems. Cracks have been discovered on structural supports that hold the wings in place, and several dozen have been grounded as a result. But while the FAA has ordered inspections, most of the 737 NGs have continued to fly.

Boeing's (BA) stock was down 1% in premarket trading following the crash, though shares recovered some of their earlier losses.

The company issued a statement Wednesday expressing condolences for the latest crash.

"This is a tragic event and our heartfelt thoughts are with the crew, passengers, and their families. We are in contact with our airline customer and stand by them in this difficult time. We are ready to assist in any way needed," said Boeing's statement.

The investigation will be made more difficult by where the crash took place, just outside Tehran, in the midst of rising tensions between Iran and the United States.

Iran says it will not hand over the black boxes from the Ukrainian Airlines Boeing 737 to American authorities. Speaking to Iran's semiofficial Mehr news agency, the head of Iran's Civil Aviation Authority, Ali Abedzadeh said that the black boxes would be analyzed in the country where the accident took place, in accordance with International Civil Aviation Organization rules. He also said Ukrainian investigators would be a part of the process.

"We will not give the black box to the manufacturer [Boeing] or America," he said.

Tensions between the United States and Iran have escalated after the recent US strike that killed Iranian military commander Qasem Soleimani. Iran fired missiles late Tuesday at two Iranian bases in Iraq where American military personnel are located. Initial reports indicated there were no fatalities from that attack, which occurred just hours before the plane crash.

By Chris Isidore

Plane crash fatalities fell more than 50% in 2019

The number of people killed in crashes of large commercial planes fell by more than 50% in 2019, according to an aviation industry study.

Last year 257 fatalities were recorded, compared to 534 in 2018, according to aviation consultancy To70.

That's despite the high-profile Boeing 737 Max crash in Ethiopia in March.

The decrease follows a general trend for the industry that's seen aviation fatalities fall even as air travel has increased sharply.

In 2019 there were 86 accidents involving large commercial planes, including eight fatal incidents, resulting in 257 fatalities, Dutch aviation consultancy To70 said.

The 157 people killed in a crash involving Ethiopian Airlines Flight 302 in March accounted for more than half of those deaths.

There was one fatal accident involving large commercial passenger planes for every 5.58 million flights, according to the report.

Last year was "one of the safest years ever for commercial aviation", according to accident tracking website the Aviation Safety Network.

In 2018, 160 incidents were recorded, including 13 fatal accidents, accounting for some 534 deaths.

The global aviation industry's safest year on record was 2017. There were no fatal passenger jet crashes that year, and only two fatal accidents involving regional turboprops that resulted in 13 deaths.

The study includes passengers, air crew, and anyone killed on the ground in a plane accident.

The types of planes covered by the research are the aircraft used by the vast majority of air passengers around the world.

The study did not include small commuter planes, and some smaller turboprop aircraft.

It also did not cover accidents involving military flights, training flights, private flights, cargo planes, and helicopters.

Air passenger safety was under intense scrutiny in 2019 after two crashes in close succession of the Boeing 737 Max aircraft.

In October 2018, a Boeing 737 Max operated by Lion Air crashed, killing all 189 people on board.

Five months later an Ethiopian Airlines plane crashed, killing 157, after which the entire 737 Max fleet was grounded.

Two killed in single-engine plane crash at airport in central Alabama

Two people have been killed in a plane crash at an airport in central Alabama. 

The incident occurred at Cullman Regional Airport-Folsom Field in Vinemont between 12.30pm and 1pm Sunday, authorities say. 

It involved a Vans RV-6 plane that crashed at the end of a runway during departure. 

The Cullman County Sheriff's Office, Cullman County EMA, and Vinemont Fire Department are assisting in the investigation.  

CRA General Manager Ben Harrison said the Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) and National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) have been notified. 

According to FlightAware data, four planes were scheduled to take off and land at the airport on Sunday. All four planes were single-engine and privately owned.  

Cullman is located roughly 50 miles north of Birmingham.  

Cortland County Sheriff’s Office investigating Christmas Eve plane crash

The Cortland County Sheriff's Office is working with the FAA to investigate a plane crash.

The Sheriff's Office says a call came in at 5:46 PM Tuesday evening at the Cortland County Airport. According to investigators, it was a single engine plane crash and only the pilot was on-board at the time.

Investigators say the pilot had been conducting some practice take off and landings for about an hour. The pilot said he had just completed a landing and was taking off again when he lost control of the plane.

We're told the plane left the runway, struck a snowbank and overturned onto its roof. The pilot was able to make it out of the plane on his own and has taken to a nearby hospital for a cut to the head. He is expected to be okay. Investigators are not naming him at this time.

The plane is a 1966 Cherokee. It appears to be a total loss.

The airport runway was closed for about 3 1/2 hours until the plane could be removed.

Iran military plane crashes near dormant volcano

An Iranian military fighter jet crashed on Wednesday, December 25, near a dormant volcano in the northwest of the country, official media reported.

State news agency IRNA said the jet went down at 9:00 am (0530 GMT) near Mount Sabalan, in the Lesser Caucasus range, and was a MiG-29 on a test flight after being overhauled.

Amateur video footage published on the social media accounts of various media outlets in Iran appeared to show smoke rising above snow-capped peaks.

A search and rescue operation was launched for the plane and its crew.

"Following the crash of a military plane in Ardabil (province), helicopter and rescue groups have been sent to the region," Iran's Red Crescent said in a statement on its website.

Iran's third-highest peak, Mount Sabalan, features a crater that turns into a lake at certain times of the year.

One person confirmed dead in plane crash northwest of Tofino

One person has died after a small plane crashed in a remote area on the west coast of Vancouver Island Saturday. 

The B.C. Coroners Service confirmed Sunday they were notified of one fatality in the crash and are investigating the circumstances surrounding the death.

The plane was headed to an airpark in Courtenay and was scheduled to land around 1:30 p.m. Saturday. Comox Valley RCMP were told that the plane was late around 4 p.m. and began contacting other Vancouver Island airports hoping to find the missing plane.

Victoria’s Joint Rescue Co-ordination Centre began a search for the plane after receiving a call from RCMP around 4:30 p.m.

Search and rescue crews went out Saturday night but weren’t able to locate it, said Maj. Sandy Bourne, the centre’s duty public affairs officer. Crews on the ground found the crash site near Sydney Inlet Provincial Park, northwest of Tofino, on Sunday morning at about 9 a.m. and confirmed it was the missing plane.

The Transportation Safety Board said the plane is a four-seat Cessna 172. The agency is trying to determine whether investigators will be able to reach the crash site, because the remote location makes access difficult. Investigators may have to wait until the plane can be moved to another location.

How MH370 and MH17 changed the way we think about air travel

Thirty-three Australians were tragically killed in two air disasters which shrouded 2014 and the years which have followed in sadness, anger and frustration.

Both incidents, which left a total of 537 passengers dead, forever seared the flight code of Malaysia Airlines into the consciousness of Australians.

What happened to Malaysia Airlines Flight 370, or MH370, remains perhaps the greatest mystery of aviation and the subject of intense speculation.

Of the 227 passengers, six were Australians. On the morning of March 8, they boarded the Boeing 777-200ER aircraft in Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia, and expected to step off in Beijing, China. The plane never arrived, and the search for the missing jet became the most costly in aviation history. The most likely scenario involved someone in the cockpit of Flight 370, probably Captain Zaharie Ahmad Shah, re-programming the aircraft's autopilot to travel south across the Indian Ocean.

The downing of Malaysia Airlines MH17, just four months later, appeared far more clear cut. All 283 passengers and 15 crew were killed, including 27 Australians.

A total of 33 Australians were needlessly killed in two air disasters in quick succession.

In the MH17 disaster, the lives of Perth parents Anthony Maslin and Marite "Rin" Norris were ripped apart in the most devastating way.

They lost their three children – Mo, 12, Evie, 10 and Otis, 8 – and Ms Norris' father, Anthony, when the jet was shot down. Their three children had been returning home to Perth for school, while they had stayed behind in Amsterdam.

Why it matters?

A nation of great travellers, Australians want to feel safe as we journey abroad. But there were also broader implications in both stories.

MH17 threw the spotlight on Moscow's intervention in the Ukraine and its likely hand in the disaster, despite denials.

What happened in the cockpit of MH370 continues to intrigue. A picture began to emerge of Captain Zaharie's mental health. Had Malaysia Airlines done enough not only to support a troubled pilot, but also spot the warning signs of an employee struggling with mental illness?

Malaysia Airlines came under intense pressure over its investigation. The carrier and Malaysian government were accused by families of MH370 victims of obscuring the truth. When disasters strike, people need and expect clarity from leaders and those in power.

What has changed?

Family members of victims are pushing for international law changes which will oblige countries embroiled in civil wars to close their airspace.

In the modern age, it was unthinkable a plane like MH370 could simply disappear. In 2016, a new aviation standard meant all aircraft over open ocean report their position every 15 minutes. The 30-day battery life of a plane's underwater locator beacons has also been increased to 90 days, beginning 2020.

Hit with two devastating disasters, Malaysia Airlines renationalized on 1 September 2015, in an attempt to avoid financial uncertainty. Meanwhile, families of the victims of MH370 and MH17 are still fighting for compensation in civil suits.

17-year-old girl tried to steal plane

A 17-year-old girl attempted to steal a small plane at a Fresno, California, airport Wednesday morning before crashing it into a building and a fence, officials said. No one was injured during the incident. 

The incident began at approximately 7:30 a.m. local time when the unnamed teen breached the fence of the Fresno Yosemite International Airport, the airport said in a statement. She entered a King Air 200 propeller-driven aircraft and was able to start one engine. 

The plane then began to move — but it quickly pivoted and crashed into a building and a fence before ever taking flight. The plane sustained what the airport described as "substantial damage."

When officers discovered and arrested the female, who was still seated in the pilot's seat wearing the pilot's headset, she was "disoriented" and "uncooperative," according to the statement, which added that she would be booked at juvenile hall.

The airport stressed in the statement that the incident occurred in the general aviation section of the airport, away from the commercial and military zones. 

"No passengers or commercial airlines were ever at risk in this incident," the airport said. "The motive is still under investigation but there is no indication of any ties to domestic terrorism." 
 
When asked at a press conference how the teen was able to breach the airport's security, airport Police Chief Drew Bessinger replied, "It's a fence. Most any fence can be climbed if you are motivated enough to go over barbed wire."

Plane crashes just short of runway at Moruya Airport

A plane has crashed just short of the runway at Moruya Airport this afternoon.

NSW Police said a man and woman onboard suffered head and leg injuries. "Their injuries are not believed to be life-threatening," the spokesperson said. The Australian Transport Safety Bureau were notified.

Civil Aviation Safety Authority spokesman Peter Gibson said a Cessna C210 engine failed while it was cruising and the aircraft hit the ground.

Mr Gibson said two people were on board and sustained serious injuries. There was substantial damage to the aircraft. A spokesman for the Westpac Lifesaver 23 rescue helicopter said the Moruya Airport-based crew went to the scene and assisted the injured pilot.

It is understood the pilot made a mayday call as the craft was coming into land, which was picked up by another aircraft.

Moruya SES spokesman Jeff McMahon said a plane had crashed about 800 metres short of the runway in shrubbery. He said there was no smoke or fire.

He said police, paramedics, Fire and Rescue, RFS, council staff and airport management were assisting.

EARLIER: A NSW Police spokesperson confirmed an aircraft crash has occurred at the Moruya Aerodrome just after 1pm and some of the occupants were injured. Police were still at the scene at 1.45pm.

1.30pm: A NSW Ambulance spokesperson said two people were on board the aircraft and it is understood one or both patients were being treated for serious head injuries.

She said three ambulance crews were on scene and a helicopter was on route.

The patients were continuing to be assessed at 1.30pm.

1.22pm: Batemans Bay Fire and Rescue captain Paul Lyons said crews were on their way to an aircraft crash near Moruya Airport.

Several Batemans Bay police vehicles rushed to attend.

Preliminary Report on Fatal Chamberlain Plane Crash

The National Transportation Safety Board released its preliminary report for its investigation into the November 30 Chamberlain crash that killed nine and injured three.

The report is preliminary and does not include a cause of the crash. However, in summary, the report says warning signals activated after takeoff signaling that the plane wasn’t going fast enough to continue climbing at the angle it was on. The plane reached its peak altitude of 460 feet before it stalled and ultimately crashed.

According to the report, the plane took off at 12:31 p.m. from runway 31 at the Chamberlain airport and crashed at 12:33 p.m. The plane was destined for Idaho Falls, Idaho.

According to data from the recorder installed on the plane, it rolled 10 degrees to the left immediately after takeoff, the roll decreased to about five degrees left as it climbed to about 170 feet above ground level before reversing to five degrees right. The plane ultimately entered a 64-degree left bank as it reached its peak altitude of 460 feet. The cockpit stall warning and stick shaker became active about one second after liftoff and the stick pusher became active about 15 seconds after liftoff. They continued intermittently for the duration of the two-minute flight.

The report says no radio communications were received from the pilot, and radar contact was never established.

The report also states the pilot and a passenger worked for three hours to remove snow and ice from the airplane before takeoff. Witnesses reported that visibility was limited by snow at the time of the crash.

The victims in the crash have been identified as Kyani founders Jim and Kirk Hansen. The crash also killed Jim Hansen’s father, Jim Hansen Sr.; Kirk Hansen’s children, Stockton and Logan; his sons-in-law, Kyle Taylor and Tyson Dennert; and Jim Hansen’s son, Jake, and grandson, Houston.

Three other extended family members were hospitalized with injuries.

The Hansen’s were executives with Conrad & Bischoff, Kyani and KJ’s Super Stores. The family was reportedly in South Dakota for a hunting trip.

Small plane crash reported at Coleman A. Young International Airport

A small plane crash was reported at the Coleman A. Young International Airport in Detroit.

The small personal twin engine jet was attempting to land at the airport and jet ran off the end of the runway, officials say. The plane had taken off from Willow Run airport and was only carrying the pilot and co-pilot – no passengers were on board.

There were no serious injuries sustained by the crew members.

"At this time, it does not appear runway conditions played any role in the incident," said Director Jason Watt. "The National Transportation Safety Board and the FAA will conduct a joint investigation into the accident."

Singapore Airlines plane suffers damage on landing in Yangon airport

A Singapore Airlines (SIA) plane was undergoing repairs after suffering damage due to a "suspected tail strike" in Myanmar last Monday (Nov 25). 

SIA spokesperson said that flight SQ998 from Singapore was landing in Yangon International Airport when the incident happened. 

A tail strike is when the tail of a plane comes into contact with the runway either during takeoff or landing. 

"The aircraft taxied to the terminal uneventfully and all passengers disembarked normally".

Engineers assessed the damage to the Airbus A330-300 and a relief aircraft was sent to Yangon to operate the return flight SQ997, the spokesperson said, adding that the plane departed at 6.23pm (local time).  

"SIA will cooperate closely with the AAIB and also conduct its own internal investigation," added the spokesperson. 

MH370: TV drama that relives fate of Malaysia Airlines passengers is launched

The mini-series has been ordered by France Televisions and will tell the story of how the Boeing 777-200 vanished on a flight from Kulala Lumpur to Beijing in March, 2014.

A TV drama mini-series reliving the tragedy of missing flight MH370 has been confirmed.

Banijay Rights has secured rights to Flight MH370 and France Televisions will work on the English-speaking show.

It is based on the novel, A Life Diverted, by Ghyslain Wattrelos, who lost his wife and two of his three children on the Malaysia Airlines plane, and French journalist Florence de Changy.

The series will be based on perspectives of families, journalists, scientists, pilots and politicians who were all left baffled after the Boeing 777-200 vanished on a journey from Kuala Lumpur to Beijing in March, 2014.

Aviation Drill On ‘Missing Plane’ Sends Shivers Among Kenyans

An aviation drill by the Kenya Civil Aviation Authority (KCAA) on Tuesday sent shivers among Kenyans over a possible crash.

It was reported that a plane from Rusinga island had gone missing.

A viral social media post indicated that the plane with six people on board was expected to land at Wilson Airport at around 9:30 am but couldn’t be located on KCAA radar.

It was further reported that the plane was last located in Narok.

In a statement, however, KCAA Director General Gilbert Kibe allayed the fears saying they were conducting a drill aimed at assessing the country’s aviation preparedness in case of an emergency or accident.

“The Aviation Search and Rescue Exercise dubbed OKOA MAISHA ASAREX 2019, was aimed at assessing the State’s level of preparedness in coordination, communication, command and control of the National Aeronautical Search and Rescue system in responding to an aviation incident or accident, ” the statement reads in part.

The multi-agency drill, according to KCAA, involved several state organs including KCAA as overall coordinator, National Police Service, Kenya Defence Forces, Kenya Meteorological Department, National Disaster Operations Centre, Kenya Wildlife Services, Ministry of Health, Kenya Airports Authority and Kenya Airways.

Small plane crash lands near Vero Beach Regional Airport, no one hurt

A small plane made a crash landing just south of the Vero Beach Regional Airport on Monday afternoon.

Photos posted to social media by Vero Beach police showed a single-engine Piper Cherokee aircraft in the grass with its wing ripped off and damage to the body of the plane.

Police said the aircraft, while is owned by FlightSafety International, a flight training and simulation company, lost power and went down in the 4100 block of Aviation Blvd.

The pilot avoided crashing into a populated area and made an emergency landing in an open field just northwest of Dodger Stadium, police said.

Officers are urging drivers to avoid the area as crews investigate and clean up the wreckage.

Pilot in the South Dakota plane crash was given the OK to fly in limited visibility

The pilot of the plane that crashed and left nine dead in South Dakota was given the OK to fly by the Federal Aviation Administration, despite limited visibility in the air, according to a press release from the National Transportation Safety Administration.

The pilot initially filed an instrument flight rules (IFR) which describes how an aircraft operates when a pilot is unable to navigate with visual references with the FAA. The single-engine Pilatus PC-12 was cleared on Saturday to fly from Chamberlain Municipal Airport to Idaho Falls, Idaho, the NTSB said.

The visibility that day was about half a mile with snow and ice along with overcast skies, the NTSB said. When the pilot didn't activate his flight plan, the FAA issued an alert for a missing plane, the NTSB said.

The plane crashed one mile north of the Chamberlain Airport. Investigators arrived at the Chamberlain, South Dakota, crash site on Monday, December 2, 2019.

Twelve people were on the flight and three survived, the NTSB said. The three survivors were taken to Sioux Falls for treatment.

Four generations of an Idaho Falls family were killed in the crash while traveling on a hunting trip. Brothers Jim and Kirk Hansen, founders of health and wellness company Kyäni Inc. were on the plane with their father, Jim Hansen Sr., Kyäni president Travis Garza said in a statement. Also killed in the crash were Jim Hansen Jr.'s son, Jake Hansen, and Jake's son, Houston. Kirk Hansen's sons, Stockton and Logan, and his sons-in-law, Kyle Naylor and Tyson Dennert, died in the crash.

Three NTSB investigators arrived at the crash site Monday after being delayed by inclement weather, the agency said. They're expected to complete their work in Chamberlain by the weekend. A preliminary report on the crash is expected to be published in two weeks, the NTSB said.

The entire investigation to determine the cause of the crash is expected to be completed within one to two years, the NTSB said.

3 dead after a plane crash in San Antonio

An emergency landing went horribly wrong Sunday night as a plane crashed in San Antonio, leaving three dead, according to fire officials.

The small, single-engine plane was leaving Sugar Land and headed to Boerne, Texas, when it developed engine trouble, San Antonio Fire Chief Charles Hood told CNN affiliate KSAT-TV.

The pilot wanted to make an emergency landing at San Antonio International Airport, Hood said, but ended up crashing into the street.

"I thought I heard a car crash into some dumpsters. But that's not what it was at all," Catherine Law, 26, told CNN affiliate KABB-TV.

Reports of the crash came in around 6:30 p.m. CST, Hood said.

The aircraft was found on the sidewalk and street completely demolished when first responders arrived.

"There were no commercial buildings hit, no apartment complexes," he said. "As tragic as it is, it could've been much worse."

A 20-block scan of the area was conducted in every direction to ensure no debris remained, Hood said.

The San Antonio Fire Department is working with police and the city's Aviation Department on the investigation.

Hood said his department was awaiting a call from the National Transportation Safety Board and Federal Aviation Administration for the next phase of the investigation.

9 Family Members Killed In South Dakota Plane Crash

Nine members of an extended Idaho family died after a plane crashed in Chamberlain, S.D., near the center of the state, on Saturday. As authorities say, among those killed were two children and the pilot.

The family of 12 were returning home to Idaho Falls from a weekend hunting trip in South Dakota. In a message posted on Facebook, Travis Garza, president of the nutritional products company Kyani, said the company's founders, Jim and Kirk Hansen, and seven of their relatives, died in the crash.

Garza said the other victims include: Jim and Kirk's father, James Hansen; Kirk's children, Stockton and Logan; his sons-in-law, Kyle Taylor and Tyson Dennert; and Jim's son, Jake, and grandson, Houston.

He said three family members were "seriously injured" in the crash. Kirk's son, Josh; Jim's son, Matt and his son-in-law, Thomas, are being treated at a South Dakota hospital, according to Garza.

NPR has not independently confirmed the identities of the victims. "We are all mourning and ask your prayers for families of the affected families," Garza wrote.

Jim and Kirk Hansen were also executives with the petroleum products distributor Conrad & Bischoff and KJ's Super Stores.

Twelve people were aboard the Pilatus PC-12 when it crashed shortly after takeoff Saturday afternoon en route from Chamberlain to Idaho Falls, Idaho, National Transportation Safety Board spokesman Peter Knudson told NPR. NTSB, which is handling the investigation, could not confirm the cause of the crash.

The three survivors were taken to Sioux Falls, S.D., about 130 miles east of Chamberlain.

According to Pilatus' website, the current PC-12 model of the single-engine turboprop plane lists a maximum capacity of one pilot and 10 passengers.

Investigators from the NTSB have been dispatched to the scene in rural Brule County, agency spokesman Knudson said. He added that investigators will look at a range of factors, including weather conditions and the aircraft's history.

A preliminary investigation report is expected to be released within two weeks, Knudson said.

Indonesian investigators blame design flaws with Boeing 737 for crash

Indonesian experts tarnish the reputation of Malaysian airlines, who was the owner of missing MH370 and the shot down MH17.

Indonesian investigators blame design flaws with Boeing 737 for crash that killed 189 passengers and crew when plane slammed into the sea just after takeoff.

Lion Air‘s flight JT-610 was heading to Pangkal Pinang, an island north of the capital, Jakarta, when it lost with air control in October 2018.

Just 13 minutes after take-off 189 passengers and crew plunged to their death.

On the 8th of March, 2014, Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 disappeared while flying from Malaysia to China, and was never located – nor were the passengers. Many experts think that it was a plane crash.

Only months later, in July of 2014, Malaysia Airlines Flight 17 was shot down on its path from Amsterdam to Malaysia while flying over Ukraine. All 283 passengers and 15 crew on board died. But there is a theory, that it was not a downing, but a plane crash.

Russia Invites Malaysian experts to study MH17 crash data

The malaysianinsight posted, that Russia has invites Malaysia to study the information it had given to the Joint Investigation Team on the 2014 Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash over eastern Ukraine.

Malaysian Foreign Minister Saifuddin Abdullah and his Russian counterpart Sergey Lavrov had a talk and claimed that "Russia has done a lot to ensure absolutely objective, detailed, concrete investigation and all the things we have transferred as data, as demonstration of what may have happened and what conclusion there might be, and all that is ignored by the JIT.”

Media: Joint investigation team gets information on MH17 crash from Ukraine that responds for not closing closed air space

Urdupoint.com published an article with a quotation of the Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov that "the Joint Investigation Team (JIT) receives many materials on the 2014 Malaysian Airlines MH17 crash over eastern Ukraine from Kiev, while it is to blame for the unclosed air space".

He also claimed that Russia has never been invited to become a member of investigating bodies despite the readiness of Moscow to contribute to the investigation of this tragedy.

Russia does not have the possibility to assess the credibility and quality of materials that JIT receives from Ukraine.

Ukraine is often blamed for not closing the air space over the combat zone in 2014.

Two planes in collision at Frankfurt airport

An Air Namibia plane collided with a Korean Air jet after landing at Frankfurt airport on Saturday evening.

Both aircraft were damaged in what Air Namibia on Sunday called "a minor accident".

A spokeswoman for Frankfurt airport said the incident happened at around 6:00 pm (1700 GMT) on Saturday. She said no one was injured and the reasons for the crash remain unclear.

"The left wing of an Air Namibia plane collided with the horizontal stabiliser of Korean Air flight KE905 as it was waiting on the taxiway after landing," Korean Air said in a statement.

The Korean Air plane was carrying 241 passengers and 40 crew at the time, it said.

"We confirm that no passengers and crew were hurt," Air Namibia added in its own statement.

Korea Air said its Seoul-bound return flight was delayed by 21 hours as a result, adding that affected passengers had been offered accommodation.

A replacement aircraft was set to take off on Sunday afternoon.

Air Namibia said it had likewise offered accommodation to 244 passengers due to travel from Frankfurt to Windhoek, as the airline looked for alternative flights.

Germany's Federal Bureau of Aircraft Accident Investigation (BFU) has opened an investigation into the cause of the collision.

The damage to the two jets was still being assessed, a BFU spokesman said.

6th victim found in small plane crash in Mexico

Officials in the western Mexico state of Michoacan say they have located a sixth victim in the crash of a small plane.

The Michoacan state prosecutor’s office says the 32-year-old pilot’s body was recovered Thursday. Authorities had confirmed the deaths of five people aboard the aircraft Wednesday.

The plane crashed Wednesday afternoon in the township of Madero. Photographs from the scene showed the small aircraft upside down in a river.

In a statement Thursday, the prosecutor’s office said it had identified three of the passengers and also had the pilot’s passport.

The state public safety agency said Wednesday that the flight originated in the northern state of Durango and was headed to the southern state of Guerrero.

Two Die In A Small Plane Crash In West Virginia

Authorities say two people have died in the crash of a small airplane in West Virginia.

The Herald-Mail in Hagerstown, Maryland, reports Middleway Volunteer Fire Chief Mike Mood confirmed the two fatalities.

Jefferson County Sheriff Pete Dougherty tells news outlets the plane caught fire on impact Thursday afternoon in Summit Point, an unincorporated community near the Virginia line.

In an emailed statement, FAA spokeswoman Kathleen Bergen said the Mooney M20 crashed with two people aboard, about 7 miles southeast of Eastern West Virginia Regional Airport in Martinsburg at 5:20 p.m.

The plane’s origin and destination weren’t immediately known. Summit Point is about 70 miles northwest of Washington, D.C.

The FAA will investigate and the National Transportation Safety Board will determine probable cause of the accident.

Brazil plane crash: Three dead as aircraft slams into cars in residential street

The plane crashed into cars in the street - setting off explosions and an inferno - shortly after taking off from Carlos Prates Airport in Belo Horizonte, Brazil

At least three people are dead after a plane crashed into cars.

Twisted aircraft wreckage and several cars were on fire as smoke billowed from a neighbourhood in Belo Horizonte in south-eastern Brazil.

Twisted aircraft wreckage and several cars were on fire as smoke billowed from a neighbourhood in Belo Horizonte in south-eastern Brazil.

The three people who were killed were an occupant of the plane, a pedestrian and a person who was in one of the cars.

Local reports said the small plane crashed shortly after taking off from Carlos Prates Airport - the second time in seven months an aircraft has crashed on the same street. 

Commercial plane carrying high school team crashes in Alaska

A commuter airplane carrying 42 people, including a high school swim team, went off the runway while landing Thursday at a small Alaska community on the Bering Sea.

Peninsula Airways said in a statement that two passengers were critically injured and 10 others were receiving medical care.

A school official said the swim team was fine and eating pizza shortly after the incident about 5:40 p.m. at the airport in Unalaska in the Aleutian Islands. "At present, all students and chaperones are accounted for and are OK, albeit a bit shaken up," a Facebook post from the school district said.

Unalaska is home to Dutch Harbor, one of the nation's busiest fishing ports.

Man who crashed his plane in Dexter has died

The man who was involved in a plane crash at Dexter Regional Airport on Wednesday died at Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center, according to hospital spokesman Bob Potts.

Rodney Wright of East Corinth was taken to the Bangor hospital Wednesday afternoon after the breeze at the airport lifted his experimental plane into the air as he was taxiing, and the plane crashed and landed upside down.

Wright suffered from a serious head injury due to the crash, and the Dexter Fire Department spent awhile trying to stabilize him before LifeFlight took him to Eastern Maine Medical Center, according to chief Matt Connor.

Potts did not release further information about the time or exact cause of Wright’s death.

World War I replica plane crashes in Dexter

A small World War I-era replica plane crashed at the Dexter Municipal Airport late Wednesday morning after a breeze lifted the taxiing plane into the air with the pilot strapped inside.

The pilot, Rodney Wright of East Corinth, who had spent three years building the experimental aircraft, suffered a serious head injury and was brought to Northern Light Eastern Maine Medical Center in Bangor, according to Chief Matt Connor of the Dexter Fire Department.

Wright was taxiing the plane with an open cockpit on a grass runway at the airport when the breeze lifted the plane, which has two sets of wings, into the air. The plane crashed down, destroying its landing gear, then ended up upside down, said Roger Nelson, the airport’s manager. Wright spent time upside down as he was strapped into the cockpit with a shoulder harness.

The airport is closed until further notice, and Maine Department of Environmental Protection staffers were on the scene Wednesday afternoon checking for fuel leaks. The FAA will conduct an investigation because the crash caused an injury.

Wednesday’s crash was the third in 20 years at the Dexter airport, according to Connor.

No charges are expected to be filed in connection with the crash.

Two people escape injury after plane crashes in Breckenridge

A Southwest Airlines flight had to be evacuated when it arrived at Midway Airport Monday morning.

A plane crashed near Breckenridge Monday afternoon.

The single-engine craft caught fire, but the two people on board were able to get out safely.

Officials told the Breckenridge Texan newspaper that he was having engine trouble as he attempted to land at the Stephens County Airport, which is just south of Breckenridge on US Highway 183.

The single-engine Socata TBM 700 can carry seven passengers plus the pilot, but only the pilot and one passenger were on board.

It was on a flight from San Angelo to Breckenridge when it crashed, plowed into a field next to the runway and caught fire.

The two on board escaped. The 12-year-old airplane was recently purchased by a corporation in San Angelo.

Breckenridge fire, police, Stephens County Sheriff, DPS and Sacred Cross EMS responded to the call.

The FAA will investigate the crash.

Canadian Snowbird plane crashes during Atlanta air show

A pilot was ejected from a Canadian Snowbird plane that later crashed at the Atlanta Air Show at the Motor Speedway Sunday afternoon. The pilot landed safely after ejecting from the CT-144 aircraft, which went down in a sparsely populated area.

The crash occurred around 1:30 p.m. The Atlanta Air Show sent out a statement to WGCL, recapping the incident:

"Snowbird 5, Captain Kevin Domon-Grenier was forced to eject from his aircraft shortly before our performance in Atlanta this afternoon," the statement read. "Domon-Grenier made it safely to the ground and is okay. The aircraft fell in an unpopulated area and no one was injured. It is too early to speculate on the cause of the incident. We are thankful Kevin and the public are unhurt."

The remaining festivities associated with the annual air show were cancelled following the crash. The Snowbirds also issued a statement on Twitter following the incident.

One man reported dead in Camarillo aircraft crash

One person was killed when a small plane crash crashed Tuesday near the Camarillo Airport, authorities said. 

The single-engine, single-seat plane was reported down just before 12:30 p.m. in an agricultural field near Las Posas and Pleasant Valley roads, said Ventura County sheriff’s Capt. Eric Hatlee.

The aircraft caught fire, but the flames had been knocked down by 12:36 p.m., fire officials said.

Capt. Brian McGrath, a spokesman for the Ventura County Fire Department, said one person on the plane was pronounced dead at the scene.

That person was the only one on the plane and there were no reports of a mayday call, fire officials said. 

The crash victim was not identified. 

US military plane crashes near Trier

The U.S. military says an F-16 fighter jet has crashed in western Germany.

The pilot escaped via the ejection seat and is being treated for minor injuries at a nearby hospital. The US Air Force confirmed it was one of its F-16 fighter jets.

The plane crashed into a forested area outside the southwestern city of Trier near the Luxembourg border.

The US Air Force confirmed that the plane is one of its F-16 fighter jets stationed at the US air base in Spangdahlem in Rhineland-Palatinate.

The cause of the crash is as yet unclear. The pilot was engaged in a routine training flight.

A large amount of jet fuel is said to have spilled out at the site of the crash. Police have cordoned off the area.

The US Air Force reports that a board of officers will investigate the cause of the accident. 

At least 24 F-16 fighter jets and around 4,000 US troops are stationed at the Spangdahlem air base. 

The U.S. military says an F-16 fighter jet has crashed in western Germany.

The pilot was able to eject to safety.Police said the plane came down in the Zemmer area, between the city of Trier and the U.S. Air Force’s Spangdahlem Air Base.

Base spokeswoman Angela Watson confirmed the plane crashed around 3 p.m. on Tuesday and the pilot was safe. She had no immediate details about the cause of the crash.

Investigation into cause of Connecticut WWII-era plane crash underway, victims identified

Federal investigators have begun looking into what caused a World War II-era B-17 bomber plane carrying 13 people to crash at a Connecticut airport Wednesday, leaving seven dead.

Connecticut State Police released the names of the seven victims on Thursday. They included pilot Ernest McCauley, 75, and co-pilot Michael Foster, 71. Passengers David Broderick, 56; Gary Mazzone, 66; James Roberts, 48; Robert Riddell, 59; and Robert Rubner, 64, also died as a result of the crash.

National Transportation Safety Board member Jennifer Homendy told reporters that McCauley had flown with the Collings Foundation, which owned the plane, for over 20 years and had acquired 7,300 hours in the B-17.

The Boeing B-17 G plane built in 1944 last underwent a major inspection in January 2019, according to Homendy. It should have undergone subsequent airworthiness inspections at 25, 50 and 75 hours but the NTSB has not yet determined the quality of those.

The plane was purchased by the Collings Foundation, a nonprofit education foundation, in 1986. It was involved in one accident in 1987 when it overran a runway, which resulted in an injury, as well as an incident when the landing gear failed to deploy.

WWII-era bombers have been involved in 21 accidents since 1982, resulting in 23 fatalities. Three of the accidents were on B-17 G planes.

The plane took off from Bradley International Airport in Windsor Locks at around 9:45 a.m. and reported engine issues to air traffic control five minutes later. At 9:53 a.m., the plane attempted to land but missed the runway, collided with a de-icing facility.

Homendy said investigators will also look into witness reports that work was being done on one or two of the engines prior to takeoff. The plane was run by four piston engines.

One of the victims, Gary Mazzone, was a retired police captain in Vernon, Conn. The 60-year-old had worked as a police officer for 22 years, part of a 42-year law enforcement career, and was a member of the Special Olympics Connecticut Hall of Fame, according to WVIT-TV. He had three children and two step-children and had retired in January as a prosecutor’s office inspector.

Mazzone's son Daniel told the Associated Press his father was a history and military buff.

“I think he just wanted to see what it was like to be in the back of a B-17,” Daniel Mazzone said. “He loved World War II. He loved people who served this country in any capacity.”

Debra Riddell posted a letter to Facebook mourning the death of her husband Robert: "He was my soul mate, I will miss him beyond [what] words can ever express."

Debra told the AP she was at the airport Wednesday to video her husband on his “bucket list” trip aboard the bomber. She said Thursday her husband texted her shortly into the trip saying they were coming back due to “turbulence.” She then recalled hearing a “really, really loud sound” followed by a huge fireball and billowing black smoke.

Ukraine plane crash: Five die as Antonov crash-lands near Lviv

An Antonov-12 transport plane crash-landed near Lviv airport in western Ukraine early on Friday, killing at least five people.

The Ukraine Air Alliance plane ran out of fuel before a planned stopover at Lviv, en route from Vigo in Spain to Istanbul, Ukraine's Infrastructure Minister Vladislav Krikliy said.

The emergencies ministry said the plane had a crew of seven, and one other person was escorting the cargo.

It is not clear what that cargo was.

Ukraine's Unian news agency described it as a military cargo plane. It had been scheduled to refuel in Lviv.

The four-engine plane vanished from radar at 07:10 local time (04:10 GMT) as it approached Lviv international airport. It crashed 1.5km (one mile) from the airport and did not catch fire.

The plane came down on soil and vegetation near a football stadium and a cemetery. Lviv airport has been closed because of the crash.

7 Killed In Crash Of A Bomber Plane At Connecticut Airport

Seven people were killed when a World War II-era plane crashed and caught fire Wednesday morning as it was attempting to land at Bradley International Airport near Hartford, Conn., according to the Federal Aviation Administration.

Thirteen people were onboard the plane, Connecticut Commissioner of the Department of Emergency Services and Public Protection James Rovella said at a news conference. Some of the survivors were in critical condition.

The vintage B-17, which was carrying 10 passengers and three crew members, reported trouble just minutes after it took off, according to Connecticut Airport Authority Executive Director Kevin Dillon.

The plane lifted off at 9:45 a.m. ET, and "five minutes into the flight, the aircraft indicated to the tower that they were experiencing some type of problem with the aircraft," Dillon said. Observers on the ground noticed that it was not gaining altitude. It circled and tried to land.

"Unfortunately, upon touchdown, the aircraft obviously lost control, struck what's known as our de-icing facility here," he said. It also hit a maintenance facility.

Aerial images from the scene show a destroyed and charred plane, and several buildings around it appear to have sustained damage.

The airport in the town of Windsor Locks was closed for several hours after the crash. The FAA said it had "put in a ground stop for flights that are destined for the airport."The plane belongs to the Collings Foundation, a nonprofit that provides educational programs about aviation history. The foundation has a touring exhibition of antique aircraft called the "Wings of Freedom Tour" featuring five WWII planes.

The National Transportation Safety Board has launched a "go team" to investigate.

The nearby town of Windsor has issued a health warning that the firefighting foam used to combat the crash fire may have discharged into the Farmington River. "The public is advised not to come into contact with foam they may encounter on the Farmington River or the river banks, as well as to not take fish from the river," the warning reads.